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6205 Schofield Ave.
Weston, WI 54476
Ph: 715-355-4050
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Stevens Point

Stevens Point East

5382 U.S. 10
Stevens Point, WI 54482
Ph: 715-341-1600
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Stevens Point South

3145 Church St.
Stevens Point, WI 54481
Ph: 715-341-1576
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Stevens Point Express

3147 Church St.
Stevens Point, WI 54481
Ph: 715-341-1576
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Green Bay

Green Bay East

2128 Main St.
Green Bay, WI 54302
Ph: 920-465-3790
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2045 S Oneida St.
Green Bay, WI 54304
Ph: 920-494-4936
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Appleton

Appleton East

3333 Express Ct.
Appleton, WI 54915
Ph: 920-993-3339
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Appleton Express

1302 N Richmond St.
Appleton, WI 54911
Ph: 920-734-0555
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424 W. Northland Ave.
Appleton, WI 54911
Ph: 920-364-9540
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Neenah

Neenah

114 South Green Bay Rd.
Neenah, WI 54956
Ph: 920-722-2466
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Sunday 30 September 2018

Engine Trouble? It Could Be a Vacuum Leak

Posted by at 4:57 AM

Engine Trouble? It Could Be a Vacuum Leak

Engine Trouble? It Could Be a Vacuum Leak

The engine in your car is essentially a big, powerful vacuum pump. The up-and-down motion of its pistons creates a vacuum, drawing air into the engine to mix with fuel and produce energy. 

The air the engine uses is carefully metered and measured by computerized sensors, and that data is used by the engine’s computer to figure out exactly how much fuel is needed for maximum power and efficiency.

When unwanted, unmetered air gets into the engine, it’s called a vacuum leak. These leaks can create a lot of problems for your vehicle. Let’s take a look at some symptoms of a vacuum leak, or you can jump ahead to some possible causes and solutions.

Signs you have a vacuum leak

The check engine light is on: Your engine’s computer can detect vacuum leaks by comparing data from various sensors. If the data from one sensor doesn’t match up with what the other sensors are reporting, the computer knows something’s wrong. It’ll log a trouble code that is retrievable with a scanning tool, and it’ll turn on the check engine light on your dashboard.

Click here to read the full article.